Collaboration with I.C.E./C.B.P.

Why this metric?

Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (I.C.E.) and Customs and Border Patrol (C.B.P.) have been breaking U.S. and international law in their aggressive efforts to capture and deport refugees and immigrants. This includes:

In addition to these specific human rights violations, I.C.E. and C.B.P.’s efforts are part of a larger pattern of the dehumanization of immigrants which has historically been a precursor to atrocities like genocide.

Although not all work done by these agencies is illegal or immoral, both their specific actions and their overall impact are harmful enough that we consider any collaboration with them to be unethical.

How the metric works

When rating a new company, we search for: a) awards to the company in public records databases; b) news stories from reliable sources; and c) company press releases relating to ICE and/or CBP. These sources are linked in the extended description section of the rating.

We use these sources to classify a company as having 'no collaboration', 'direct collaboration', 'indirect collaboration', or 'undisclosed collaboration' with I.C.E. or C.B.P. 'No collaboration' is a green value, 'indirect collaboration' is a yellow value, and 'direct collaboration' and 'undisclosed collaboration' are red values.

'Direct collaboration' is defined as any contract related to the imprisonment or deportation of immigrants and/or asylum seekers.

'Indirect collaboration' is defined as any other type of contract.

'Undisclosed collaboration' is used when the company refuses to disclose some or all of their contracts with I.C.E. or C.B.P. This can be an ambiguous label if only some of the contracts have been disclosed. If the contracts that have been disclosed are direct collaboration, we use the label 'direct collaboration'. If the contracts that have been disclosed are indirect collaboration, we use the label 'undisclosed collaboration'. Either way, this ambiguity is clarified in the extended description section of the rating.

Score: No Collaboration

Our search of the public records databases show no active contracts with the Department of Homeland Security, the agency which houses I.C.E. and C.B.P. No news sources or company press releases can be found which contradict this assessment.

Score: No Collaboration

Our search of the public records databases show no active contracts with the Department of Homeland Security, the agency which houses I.C.E. and C.B.P. No news sources or company press releases can be found which contradict this assessment.

Score: No Collaboration

Our search of the public records databases show no active contracts with the Department of Homeland Security, the agency which houses I.C.E. and C.B.P. No news sources or company press releases can be found which contradict this assessment.

Score: No Collaboration

Our search of the public records databases show no active contracts with the Department of Homeland Security, the agency which houses I.C.E. and C.B.P. No news sources or company press releases can be found which contradict this assessment.

Score: Undisclosed Collaboration

Our search of the public records databases show approximately 1200 contracts between Dell and either I.C.E. or C.B.P. over the last four fiscal years. These contracts total approximately $160 million. This is in line with what’s been reported in reputable news sources like Time. We can find no press releases from Dell which dispute or explain these contracts.

Score: Undisclosed Collaboration

Our search of the public records databases show approximately 28 contracts between Verizon and its subsidiaries and either I.C.E. or C.B.P. over the last four fiscal years. These contracts total approximately $870,000. However, we can find no news articles reporting this information, nor any press releases from Verizon about this topic.

Score: Undisclosed Collaboration

Our search of the public records databases show approximately 74 contracts between Microsoft and either I.C.E. or C.B.P. over the last four fiscal years. These contracts total approximately $101 million. This is in line with what’s been reported in reputable news sources like the New York Times and NBC News, although most articles report only on contracts with I.C.E., which total a smaller amount ($12.3 million over the last for fiscal years.) Microsoft has stated that ‘Microsoft is not working with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement or U.S. Customs and Border Protection on any projects related to separating children from their families at the border, and contrary to some speculation, we are not aware of Azure or Azure services being used for this purpose.’ However, they have not provided a full accounting of what their contracts are for, and have not commented on whether any of their projects are related to the imprisonment and deportation of immigrants more generally.